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  • A senior adult driving
    Expert

    Driving and Glaucoma: What You Should Know

    Driving a car is for some synonymous with independence and is important to quality of life, from the time we are teenagers and first given the opportunity to pass the driver’s test, through adulthood. However, recent research suggests that people with even mild- to moderate-glaucoma have higher rates of errors when driving, which places themselves and others at risk. Learn why glaucoma can impair driving, how you can seek help, and options for transportation alternatives.

    Thursday, January 12, 2017
  • Find a Specialist
    Expert

    Understanding the Health Care Team in Alzheimer's Disease

    Warning signs of cognitive decline, such as forgetting conversations or missing appointments, could be early signs of Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia. They could also represent a treatable condition, such as a medication side effect or depression. Either way, it’s important to figure out what’s wrong, why it’s happening, and what to do. This article provides helpful information on the range of health care providers, including specialists, who may become involved in Alzheimer's care.

    Thursday, January 12, 2017
  • New Diagnosis?

    Managing a mind and sight disease is a journey. And you’re not alone. We can help.

  • Older sister holding a younger sister with Down syndrome.
    Expert

    Down Syndrome and Alzheimer’s Disease: Related Disorders, Overlapping Needs

    People who have Down syndrome are living longer than ever before, and a significant number of them will go on to develop Alzheimer’s disease. This article explores the connection between these two disorders, and provides a summary of interventions that may help people who have both conditions.

    Tuesday, January 3, 2017
  • More than 7 Million

    people will have Alzheimer's disease in the United States by 2030.
  • Find a Specialist
    Expert

    Understanding the Health Care Team in Alzheimer's Disease

    Warning signs of cognitive decline, such as forgetting conversations or missing appointments, could be early signs of Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia. They could also represent a treatable condition, such as a medication side effect or depression. Either way, it’s important to figure out what’s wrong, why it’s happening, and what to do. This article provides helpful information on the range of health care providers, including specialists, who may become involved in Alzheimer's care.

    Thursday, January 12, 2017
  • Older sister holding a younger sister with Down syndrome.
    Expert

    Down Syndrome and Alzheimer’s Disease: Related Disorders, Overlapping Needs

    People who have Down syndrome are living longer than ever before, and a significant number of them will go on to develop Alzheimer’s disease. This article explores the connection between these two disorders, and provides a summary of interventions that may help people who have both conditions.

    Tuesday, January 3, 2017
  • New Diagnosis?

    Managing a mind and sight disease is a journey. And you’re not alone. We can help.

  • Photo of microglia (green) and neurons (red). Image by Gerry Shaw, EnCor Biotechnology Inc. (Wikicommons).
    Expert

    A New Angle on Alzheimer’s Disease: The Inflammation Connection

    Learn how the immune system and inflammation play a role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease, and how targeting specific elements of the inflammatory process could be useful in treating or preventing this brain disorder.

    Tuesday, January 3, 2017
  • Illustration of the brain
    Expert

    Alzheimer’s or Dementia: What’s the Difference?

    Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of major neurocognitive disorder, formerly known as dementia. Learn more about the difference between major neurocognitive disorder, mild neurocognitive disorder, and the pre-symptomatic phase of Alzheimer’s disease.

    Monday, November 14, 2016
  • What happens to your brain duringAlzheimer's Disease?

    Track how nerve cells and the brain change from healthy to affected by mild and then severe Alzheimer's disease.
  • Acupuncturist teaching a class.
    Expert

    Alternative Medicine for Macular Degeneration: Does it Work?

    Some patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) look to alternative medicine for prevention options. While there is strong evidence that certain vitamins and diets can reduce your risk of vision disease, other approaches, such as rheophoresis, microcurrent stimulation, and acupuncture are unproven at present.

    Tuesday, January 3, 2017
  • New Diagnosis?

    Managing a mind and sight disease is a journey. And you’re not alone. We can help.

  • Patient consulting with an eye doctor
    Expert

    How Effective are Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments?

    A dozen years ago, there were hardly any treatments for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Fortunately there are now several, and the best way to evaluate their effectiveness is to review the results of large, well-designed clinical trials.

    Tuesday, January 3, 2017
  • Macular degeneration scientist looking through a microscope
    Expert

    Update on Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    New treatments for the advanced form of dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are on the horizon. Learn about these new experimental drugs; novel mechanisms that are actively being studied regarding the development of macular degeneration; and helpful suggestions that might decrease your risk of progression to the late stage of this eye disease.

    Tuesday, January 3, 2017
  • By 202040 million

    People will have visual impairments from advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
  • A senior adult driving
    Expert

    Driving and Glaucoma: What You Should Know

    Driving a car is for some synonymous with independence and is important to quality of life, from the time we are teenagers and first given the opportunity to pass the driver’s test, through adulthood. However, recent research suggests that people with even mild- to moderate-glaucoma have higher rates of errors when driving, which places themselves and others at risk. Learn why glaucoma can impair driving, how you can seek help, and options for transportation alternatives.

    Thursday, January 12, 2017
  • New Diagnosis?

    Managing a mind and sight disease is a journey. And you’re not alone. We can help.

  • Eye Exam - Gonioscopy
    Expert

    Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma: What to Know

    This article discusses primary angle-closure glaucoma, the second most common form of this eye disease. The author discusses important information to know about symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, known risk factors, and more.

    Tuesday, January 10, 2017
  • Electronic hand magnifier
    Expert

    Low Vision and Glaucoma

    When people with glaucoma are diagnosed and treated at an early stage, many will not lose significant vision. Unfortunately, some will develop low vision. This article explores what that is, how low-vision specialists perform an evaluation, and provides helpful tips on low- and high-tech devices that can help a person use their remaining vision most effectively.

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016
  • More than3 million

    Americans aged 40 and older have glaucoma. It is estimated that the number will double to 6 million people by 2050.

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