Text Size Normal Text Sizing Button Medium Text Sizing Button Large Text Sizing Button Text Contrast Normal Contrast Button Reverse Contrast ButtonSwitch to Spanish Language Press Room Contact Us Sitemap Sign In Register
Link to Homepage About BrightFocus
BrightFocus
Donate Now Get Involved  
Alzheimer's Disease Research Macular Degeneration Research National Glaucoma Research


Stay Informed: Medical and Research Updates
Connect With Us!
 

 

Gammagard Fails to Slow Alzheimer’s Disease

May 7, 2013
Source: Baxter International

Baxter International Inc. today announced that its Phase III clinical study of Gammagard (immunoglobulin [IG]) did not meet its co-primary endpoints of reducing cognitive decline and preserving functional abilities in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. The Gammaglobulin Alzheimer's Partnership (GAP) study was conducted by Baxter in collaboration with the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study (ADCS), a clinical trial consortium supported by the United States National Institute on Aging in the National Institutes of Health.

Alzheimer's disease

The GAP study was the largest placebo-controlled study of immunoglobulin, and was designed to assess the safety and effectiveness of Baxter's IG as a potential treatment for signs and symptoms associated with Alzheimer's disease. The clinical trial treated 390 patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease across 45 centers in the U.S. and Canada. Patients were randomized to treatment with Baxter's IG treatment at either 400 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg dosing every two weeks for 18 months, or placebo. All patients were required to maintain their treatment regimen of approved medications for Alzheimer's disease symptom management.

Topline analyses from the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center trial found that after 18 months of treatment, patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease did not demonstrate a statistically significant difference in the rate of cognitive decline as compared to placebo.

While the study was not powered to show statistical significance among the sub-groups, in the pre-specified sub-group analysis, the 400mg/kg treatment arm showed a positive, numerical difference in change from baseline versus placebo in cognition among both moderate patients and carriers of the ApoE4 genetic marker. These differences ranged between 16 percent and 29 percent. 

"The study missed its primary endpoints; however, we remain interested by the pre-specified sub-group analyses, particularly among patients with moderate disease and those who carry a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, two patient groups that are in great need of advances in care. A detailed analysis of the results from the GAP study continues, and we look forward to a greater understanding of the full data set," said Ludwig Hantson, Ph.D., president of Baxter's BioScience business. "We are grateful for the participation of the patients and physicians in the study and for the dedicated support of the patients' caregivers."

Based on these results, Baxter will reconsider its current approach for its Alzheimer's program and will determine next steps after full data analyses. The current Baxter studies of IG in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease will be discontinued. Additional analyses from the study, including imaging, will be made available later this year as part of a full presentation of the GAP study at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference, July 13-18, 2013 in Boston.

"No approved or investigational medication for Alzheimer's disease has succeeded in a clinical trial of this size and duration. Unfortunately, observations of IG seen in earlier phases of studies of Alzheimer's patients did not translate into a positive outcome in the GAP study," said Norman Relkin, M.D., Ph.D., a neurologist from the Weill Cornell Medical College and GAP Study Leader. "Analysis of the full study results is still ongoing. I am optimistic that the knowledge we gain from this study will advance efforts to develop effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease."

Adapted from Baxter International

View all news updates for Alzheimer's disease


Disclaimer: The information provided in this section is a public service of the BrightFocus Foundation, and should not in any way substitute for the advice of a qualified healthcare professional, and is not intended to constitute medical advice. Although we take efforts to keep the medical information on our website updated, we cannot guarantee that the information on our website reflects the most up-to-date research. Please consult your physician for personalized medical advice; all medications and supplements should only be taken under medical supervision. BrightFocus Foundation does not endorse any medical product or therapy.

Some of the content in this section is adapted from other sources, which are clearly identified within each individual item of information.

Shop for a Cause YouTube Twitter Connect With Us Pinterest Google+