Tips & How-Tos

10 Tips to Make Your Home Dementia Friendly

Wednesday, July 22, 2015
Keys with name tags

A home that is dementia friendly can decrease your loved one's risk of falling and provide freedom to use their own abilities.

  • Keep window coverings open throughout the day to allow natural light in, only closing them as needed to complete daily routines. Keep windows clean. Close drapes at night to avoid reflections on the window and to indicate it is nighttime.
  • Tape down area rugs, or remove altogether. Remove all tripping hazards and clutter. Remove any cables or wires that are running across the floor.
  • Keep a list of phone numbers with the telephone. If necessary, add photos to the numbers so that they are recognizable.
  • If looking into mirrors becomes a problem, cover or remove them.
  • Keep upholstery and floor patterns simple, with minimal pattern. Avoid clashing colors. On floors, avoid wavy lines, stripes, or changes of color between rooms.
  • Replace socket and switch plates with ones that are a contrasting color to the wall.
  • Use a small bulletin board for your loved one’s daily routine and to do list. Direct your loved one to it everyday.
  • Have a designated area to drop the keys, glasses, mail, etc.
  • Label the contents of drawers and cupboards using colorful photo images, or with cards or post-it notes. Do the same with doors, placing signs eye level for the one with dementia.
  • Keep household cleaners in a locked cabinet.

Learn helpful tips, room by room, on how to make your home dementia friendly.


Sources

McNair, D. (2011, Oct 25). Lighting for people with dementia.
Dementiacare.org. Making your home more dementia friendly.

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