Tips & How-Tos

Choosing the Right Medication

Saturday, April 2, 2016
Senior man examiining his medications

The medication that you and your doctor decide is best for you will depend on a number of factors, including (but not limited to):

  • Are you allergic or sensitive to any drugs or their ingredients?
  • How effective is it, and does it stay effective over time?
  • How quickly does it get results?
  • Can it be combined with another medication, now or in the future, for increased effect?
  • Will it impact other health conditions (blood pressure, or balance, for example)?
  • Will it interact badly with any other medications you are taking?
  • Is it convenient?
  • What are the side effects, are they typically transient or long-lasting, and can you tolerate them?
  • What is the risk of a serious adverse effect or reaction?
  • Are you able to administer the medication correctly at home?

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